Poached Eggs with Salmon Roe

poached-eggs-with-salmon-roe
Poached Eggs with Salmon Roe

I used to think that the only way to get good poached eggs was at a restaurant that specialized in breakfast fare.  That was until I came across this super easy way to poach eggs, which opened up endless possibilities for a homemade breakfast or brunch, or even dinner. Don’t you love breakfast for dinner? Poaching is the best way to keep the eggs’ (or, I should say yolks’) nutritional goodness closer to its natural state, without affecting the structure of their delicate nutrients, or exposing  precious fat to air oxidation. As opposed to skillet cooking, when the cooking surface can reach 400ºF, the boiling water doesn’t exceed 212ºF. The source of eggs is extremely important; you will multiply the amount of nutrients you get from eggs if you choose to buy from local responsible farmers who raise birds on open pastures. The only cleaning eggs should be subjected to is washing with water. Commercial post processing, even of the best organic brands, involves some serious chemicals that you don’t want anywhere close to your belly.

Wild salmon roe, even in small quantities, is far more effective at providing you with countless health benefits than any supplement ever could. It is the highest source of bio-available and non-processed Omega 3 acids, a super nutrient for all functions of your body (source); and is very high in vitamins C, D and E, thiamine, folate, vitamin B12 and selenium. You can get wild salmon roe at most ethnic stores, it costs about $35-45 per pound. I get 1/3 of a pound at least once a week, and eat it daily. I feel that it’s one of the best ways I can spend money. If your store has a selection – look for kind that has only two ingredients: salmon roe and salt. It has a very mild flavor, which is easily palatable even by those who dislike fish. The flavor is actually a lot milder than most fish oil supplements I’ve tried. It also goes perfectly with poached eggs! Add chives, or some baby greens, and a small side of fermented veggies for an ultimate healthy meal that will give you all day energy.

HOW TO MAKE POACHED EGGS WITH SALMON ROE

Ingredients
4 cups water
1/2 cup white vinegar
Eggs (any amount you’d like)
1-2 teaspoons of salmon roe for each egg
Salt and pepper to taste

Equipment
Small saucepan
Large spoon for stirring
Slotted spoon for removing eggs

Instructions
Boil water in a saucepan.
Add vinegar, wait until it comes to rapid boil, turn the flame down to low.
Swirl boiling vinegar water with a large spoon to create a whirlpool.
Break eggs, one at a time, into the center of the whirl. There’ll be some strands of egg white floating around, just disregard them.
Cook for 5 minutes; remove with a slotted spoon. Serve topped with 1 or 2 teaspoons of salmon roe.

Poached Eggs with Salmon Roe
 
Prep time
Cook time
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Super easy way to make fool-proof poached eggs every time. Serve them with salmon cavier, or on top of a crispy buttered toast.
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast
Ingredients
  • 4 cups water
  • ½ cup white vinegar
  • Eggs (any amount you'd like)
  • 1-2 teaspoons of salmon roe for each egg
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Boil water in a saucepan.
  2. Add vinegar, wait till it comes to rapid boil, turn the flame down to low.
  3. Swirl boiling vinegar water with a large spoon to create a whirlpool.
  4. Break eggs, one at a time, into the center of the whirl. Disregard any strands of egg white floating around.
  5. Cook for 5 minutes; remove with a slotted spoon.
  6. Serve topped with 1 or 2 teaspoons of salmon roe.

poached-eggs-with-salmon-roe
Poached Eggs with Salmon Roe

 

2 Comments

  1. Ooooh, if only I could find wild salmon roe locally! The shipping for purchasing online is horrendous. I have never attempted poached eggs. I’ll have to give your method a try!

    • Yeah, agreed! Shipping on salmon roe or caviar is silly expensive, plus I’d rather have it frozen than canned. All the canned roe has a bunch of preservatives I could do without. Look for ethnic markets that cater to eastern Europeans (Polish, Russian, Ukranian, etc), they are most likely to have it available at reasonable prices and with good stock rotation. Also, before you invest in it, make sure you try it and like it since it’s an acquired taste and texture 🙂 Forgive me if I’m saying something you already know!!

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